Articles Posted in IRS Tax Relief

In 2003, Congress allowed eligible taxpayers to deduct contributions up to a certain amount to a health savings account (HSA). In order to qualify for the HSA deduction, a taxpayer must be covered by a high-deductible health plan (HDHP). This means that the plan must require the covered individual to pay a rather large amount out-of-pocket before the insurer must contribute. The HDHP is not, however, required to have a high deductible for services deemed “preventive care.” In July 2019, the IRS issued Notice 2019-45, which describes an expanded list of medical services and medications that will be considered preventive care for the purposes of HSA deductions. This is hopefully good news for people who need various preventive medical services.

What Is a Health Savings Account?

Congress created HSA’s in the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003. Title XII of the bill, entitled “Tax Incentives for Health and Retirement Security,” adds a new § 223 to the Internal Revenue Code (IRC), codified at 26 U.S.C. § 223. It allows “eligible individuals” to deduct contributions to an HSA, with an annual limit of $2,250 for a health insurance plan with single coverage, or $4,500 for a family plan. Additional contributions are allowed for people who are 55 years old or older. In order to be an “eligible individual,” they must be covered by an HDHP.

What Is a High-Deductible Health Plan?

Section 223(c)(2) of the IRC defines an HDHP as a health insurance plan with an annual deductible of at least $1,000 for a single individual, or $2,000 for a family; and an annual sum of the deductible and out-of-pocket expenses of no more than $5,000 for an individual or $10,000 for a family.
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Nearly every adult in the U.S. must file an annual federal income tax return with the IRS that discloses their income, identifies tax deductions and credits, and states the amount of tax that is owed. What happens if a taxpayer fails to file on time? The consequences could include penalties and interest, as well as limits on the ability to obtain relief if they cannot afford to pay their tax bill.

What Are the Tax Deadlines?

Federal income tax returns are due on April 15 of each year. If the 15th falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or federal holiday, the due date is the next business day. California has the same deadline for state income tax returns.

Taxpayers may be able to obtain an extension of up to six months to file their federal tax return. This typically requires filing an extension form, and paying their estimated tax owed, prior to the April deadline.
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Our tax system requires most taxpayers to make regular payments to the IRS throughout the year. The tax return that is due to the IRS every April 15 shows the final amount of tax owed for the year, as well as the amount of tax already paid by, or on behalf of, the taxpayer. If the amount paid is less than the amount owed, the taxpayer could be liable for underpayment penalties. In January 2019, the IRS announced that it was expanding eligibility for waivers of underpayment penalties. Taxpayers who paid at least eighty-five percent of their final tax bill can have their entire underpayment penalty waived.

Ongoing Tax Payments

Federal income tax is a “pay-as-you-go” system. Taxpayers must pay tax on the income they earn as they earn it. Payments are due every quarter.

Employers can withhold taxes from their employees’ paychecks. The amount of withholding is based on information provided by each employee on Form W-4. Every quarter, employers must remit all amounts withheld from payroll.
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Federal tax law is complicated, to put it lightly. Taxpayers routinely find themselves having difficulty understanding various provisions of tax laws and regulations. Congress has tried to help by creating the Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR), which identifies ten key rights, and which serves as a directive to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Commissioner and all IRS employees.

The Taxpayer Bill of Rights

1. Information

Taxpayers have a right to know what tax laws and regulations affect them. To the greatest extent possible, the IRS has a duty to explain the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) and IRS regulations. It has met this duty through a truly impressive volume of publications, including instructions for every tax form.

2. Quality Service

This involves the right to prompt, polite, and helpful interactions with the IRS.
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